Bone Broths (Liquid Stocks)

Bone Broths
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Bone Broths

Liquid gold.

That’s what it is. Our great grandmother’s knew it and wouldn’t be without it, but somewhere along the way, old-fashioned broth fell out of everyday use, and stock cubes and packs of insipid factory-made stock took its’ place. But now it’s making a comeback! And so it should – bone broths are the natural way to beautifully flavour soups, stews, casseroles and sauces while imparting gut-healing goodness and easy to digest minerals. 

You’ve probably heard about how good bone broth is for you. Traditional, slow cooked broth (or stock) contains many minerals in a form that the body can easily absorb. The gelatine in the broth protects and heals the lining of the digestive tract, and is very high in amino acids like glycine, which are anti-inflammatory and calming. You know how when you get a cold, you crave soup? There’s a reason for that. Not only does it feel good on a sore throat, but it really does help you get well. This is one of our favourite recipes for when we’re feeling a bit ‘under the weather’ – Coconut Chicken Lemon Soup. You can just feel it doing you good!

 
bone broths (liquid stocks)

Do you make your own broths and stocks? I love to have a big pot of broth gently simmering on the stove. It becomes the base for so many meals. For example…

 Breakfast: eggs poached in chicken broth, sometimes with some added veges, or some leftover rice or noodles or avocado

Bone BrothsLunch: add in some veges and maybe some meat for a quick but very nourishing soup

Bone Broth

Dinner: add some beef mince, ginger, garlic, chilli, veges and greens to beef broth for an Asian-style meal, served with rice or mung bean vermicelli

Chicken Broths

If you’ve never made old-fashioned stock or broth before, it’s time to get started, both for the health benefits and the amazing flavour that will add so much more to your meals! It’s really simple.

My friend Leah Follett and I made a quick video for you on broth techniques and tips, and we also did a whole podcast on it! Check them out here:

Making Bone Broth – Video

Bone Broths: How and Why to Make Them – Podcast

Here’s some recipes to get you started.

** Important Note for GAPS Patients and those with Amine intolerance: When making your own bone broths, the cooking time will vary depending on where you are at with healing. If you don’t have major gut issues you can cook broth overnight, no problems. If you are on early GAPS or have amine intolerance, you should go slow with broth. Start with stocks made from meat only (lamb is great for this), and cook for 1 1/2 hours. Work up to bone broths, and only cook for 2 hours at first (approx. 3 hours in a slow cooker on high), using very fresh, organic meat/bones, and cool and freeze immediately so that amine levels don’t increase. Lamb and chicken broths are best to start with. See a GAPS practitioner for advice, if needed.

Chicken Broth
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Ingredients
  1. 1 whole, fresh chicken, or approx. 2 kg chicken pieces, or a chicken carcass (organic, free range)
  2. 3-4 litres filtered water, room temperature
  3. 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
  4. 1 large onion, roughly chopped
  5. 2 carrots, peeled and roughly chopped
  6. 2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped (optional)
To cook poached chicken and make broth at the same time
  1. Place whole chicken or chicken pieces into a large, heavy-based stock pot, cover with water, add other ingredients and bring to a boil over medium heat. Remove any foam that rises to the top, cover, reduce heat and simmer for approx. 2 hours. Remove meat from bones and place in fridge to use for other meals. (For slow cooker, cook for 3-4 hours on high, then remove meat from bones.)
  2. If cooking broth for longer, return bones to pot or slow cooker, and continue to cook for another few hours. (See note below on cooking times.)
  3. Strain off broth, discard bones and vegetables, and pour into jars/containers.
  4. Store broth in the fridge for up to a week, or freeze for up to 6 months. (Make sure you leave about 3cm of space at the top of the jar/container as liquids expand when freezing.)
To make broth from chicken carcass
  1. If starting with a whole chicken, cut meat off bones (as much as you can) and refrigerate to use in other meals. (Use fresh chicken within 24 hours – can be frozen if you bought the chicken fresh.) The fat can be added to the stock as it gives flavour and helps nutrients to be absorbed more easily. OR start with a chicken carcass left over from a roast dinner, or a raw carcass from the butcher.
  2. Place the bones (and any fat) into a large, heavy-based stockpot or slow cooker. If you are cooking up your own chickens, or have access to the 'whole' chickens, you can also add the chicken feet.
  3. Bring to a gentle boil and skim off any foam that rises to the top. Reduce heat, and simmer on low for 1 ½ to 3 hours (or cook 3-4 hours on high in a slow cooker). Take carcass out of broth, and remove any remaining meat from bones. (Refrigerate meat to use in meals.)
  4. Return bones to broth and continue to simmer for another few hours if you're ok with longer cooking times.* If you are using a pot on the stove, keep heat low and top up water as needed so that the bones are always covered.
  5. Strain the broth into into jars/containers. Discard bones and vegetables.
  6. Store in the fridge for up to a week, or freeze for up to 6 months. (Make sure you leave about 3cm of space at the top of the jar/container as liquids expand when freezing.)
Notes
  1. Cooking time is very individual - if you are sensitive to amines, you will need to cook the broth for only 2 hours (using organic chicken meat/bones) then cool and freeze immediately. As your gut heals, you can slowly increase cooking times.
  2. Amines increase the longer you cook the broth. Older meat will also be higher in amines, so buy very fresh meat/bones from a butcher.
  3. I don’t add salt to my broth until it’s finished, as it depends how long you cook it as to how much you’ll need. Just season to taste once it’s finished.
  4. If you're drinking broth as a gut-healing 'medicine', just warm up half a cup of broth on the stovetop, add a little sea salt and freshly minced garlic, and sip like a cup of hot tea at least once a day.
  5. Once cold, the stock should become a ‘gel’, and there will be a layer of fat on top. This is good - it helps to preserve the stock.
Variations
  1. Once you are well on the road to healing (after stage 3 if you are doing GAPS), you can begin to add celery, celery leaves, and herbs to your broth if desired, for extra flavour. Add 1 stalk celery with leaves (chopped), and a handful of chopped parsley, rosemary, sage and thyme.
Quirky Cooking http://www.quirkycooking.com.au/
 
Beef and Lamb Broth
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Ingredients
  1. 2kg beef or lamb bones - a mixture of marrow, knuckle and meat bones
  2. 3 litres filtered water (approx.), room temperature
  3. ¼ cup of apple cider vinegar
  4. 1 large brown onion, roughly chopped
  5. 2 carrots, roughly chopped
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients into a large stockpot or slow cooker, with enough water to cover bones.
  2. Simmer for at least 2 hours* on the stovetop (or cook 3-4 hours on high in slow cooker). Can simmer for up to 24 hours if you're ok with long cooking times. (See note re cooking times, below.)
  3. Strain broth and discard bones and vegetables.
  4. Store broth in the coolest part of the fridge for up to a week*, or separate into jars or containers and freeze for up to 6 months. (Make sure you leave about 3cm of space at the top of the jar/container as liquids expand when freezing.)
Notes
  1. Cooking time is very individual - if you are sensitive to amines, you will need to cook the broth for only 2 hours (using organic lamb or chicken meat/bones) then cool and freeze immediately. As your gut heals, you can slowly increase cooking times.
  2. Amines increase the longer you cook the broth. Beef is higher in amines, and older meat will also be higher in amines, so buy very fresh meat/bones from a butcher.
  3. I don’t add salt to my broth until it’s finished, as it depends how long you cook it as to how much you’ll need. Just season to taste once it’s finished.
  4. If you're drinking broth as a gut-healing 'medicine', just warm up half a cup of broth on the stovetop, add a little sea salt and freshly minced garlic, and sip like a cup of hot tea at least once a day.
  5. Once cold, the stock should become a ‘gel’, and there will be a layer of fat on top. This is good - it helps to preserve the stock. Beef broth will have a thick layer of fat (tallow) – you can remove it and keep in the fridge to use for frying.
Variations
  1. Once you are well on the road to healing, (after stage 3 if you are on GAPS), you can begin to add celery, celery leaves, and herbs to your broth if desired, for extra flavour. To beef or lamb broth, add 1-2 stalks celery with leaves (chopped), a handful of fresh thyme (chopped), a handful of parsley (chopped), and a bay leaf.
Quirky Cooking http://www.quirkycooking.com.au/
Recipes that are great for using the reserved meat from the chicken:
 

bone broths

  

24 Comments

  1. […] my recipe for making the chicken broth for the recipe (highly recommended – tastes awesome!!), or you can make your own coconut […]

  2. […] this nutritionally dense and vitally important food. Useful links: Jo’s broth recipes: Bone Broths (Liquid Stocks)Leah’s broth recipes: Bone Broth Jo and Leah’s broth making video: Making Beef Bone […]

  3. […] filling, I decided to use my delicious, Cauliflower and Leek Mash. I added more chicken broth (recipe here) to make a thick sauce, as well as some onions, garlic and herbs for more […]

  4. Jas says:

    Hi Jo

    I was wondering if there is another veg I could use for the chicken broth instead of celery? I cant stand the smell 🙁

  5. Jas says:

    Hi Jo

    Just wondering with the Chicken broth, can I sub the celery for another vegetable? I’m really not a big fan :(. Thank you 🙂

  6. […] – Practice nose to tail eating: Don’t waste the bones from the meats you cook – use them to make delicious and nutritious bone broths! Roast the bones first for a fuller, deeper flavour. Add in the chicken feet and even heads for a great, gelatinous chicken broth, for example, that doesn’t waste anything. (If you’ve never made your own bone broths before, here’s how.) […]

  7. amy says:

    Can I just put the whole chicken in the slow cooker raw from the fridge and cook a broth this way? remove the chicken when the meat is done and put the bones back in the pot? will this be effective?

  8. […] and strong. Quirky Jo has made a YouTube video about making bone broth and she has an amazing coconut chicken soup recipe which is made with bone […]

  9. Rochelle says:

    I’ve just made beef bone broth and now it has solidified, I’ve scraped the fat off the top but all that has remained is a jelly like substance. What have I done wrong?

    • QuirkyJo says:

      Nothing, that is perfect!! You’ve made the best stock 🙂 The gelatine in the stock is what is so healing. When you heat it up it will liquify.

  10. sabIne says:

    HI – I was wonderIng If It was possIble to do the bone broth In the ThermomIx ?

  11. Tracy says:

    Hi Jo, Is there any reason/s why ham or pork bones aren’t suggested to use for making bone broths?

    • QuirkyJo says:

      You can use them, and they are delicious! Just be aware that if you’re just starting out on broths, pork broth can be a bit too rich for some. Make it the same way as you make beef broth.

  12. Paula says:

    Can i use uncooked frozen chicken bones? Can i then freeze?

  13. Henriette says:

    Just wondering on your thoughts about cooking broths in a stainless steel pressure cooker, are they as good health wise as slow cooking! Thanks

  14. Ness says:

    Hey, I wonder if you have tried bone broth in the thermomix and if you see any issues doing it in there for 40 mins vs in a pot for hours?

    • QuirkyJo says:

      Hi Ness, you won’t get the same result as you really need a good 2 hours at least, and it won’t make much in the Thermomix. Best to do it in a big stock pot on the stove.

  15. Courtney says:

    Hi Jo, I made some chicken broth last night but after being in the fridge overnight it is still liquid not like jelly and is very bland. I cooked a whole chicken in the slow cooker on high for 4hrs removed the meat and continued cooking the bones for another 2hrs. Any idea what I would have done wrong? Thanks

    • QuirkyJo says:

      I usually do it in a pot on the stove on low for three hours, and then remove meat as the flavour is better on a higher simmer than in a slow cooker.
      It will also gel this way.
      🙂

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