Nourishing Your Family

Recipes & Resources from Our Seminar!

Fermented Carrots
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Ingredients
  1. Carrots, sliced 1cm pieces (you will need enough to fill your jar to the shoulder)
  2. 20g Salt
  3. 1L filtered water
  4. Anaerobic fermenting jar/crock
Instructions
  1. Fill jar with carrots - ensure jar is filled all the way to the centre of the shoulder.
  2. Make up a 2% brine by mixing 20g of salt with 1L of filtered water. Pour the brine over the carrots, filling to above the shoulder, leaving a 1 inch gap when lid is closed. (It won’t matter if they poke up out of the brine a little, as long as you are using air-lock jars or a crock that keeps oxygen out.)
  3. Close lid and place airlock in the top and fill with 2 tablespoons of water (or if using a crock, fill the moat with water.)
  4. Place in a cool cupboard or away from direct sunlight to ferment for 1 week.
  5. Move to fridge and ferment for a further 2 weeks (ideally leaving air lock in, if it will fit in the fridge.) Carrots and brine are then ready to consume, raw or added to cooking!
Storage
  1. Store in the fridge with airlock in place if possible, or if you are consuming them quite quickly you can remove to airtight jars.
  2. Ferments will last in the fridge for at least a year, just be careful to always use clean utensils when removing veggies from jars, and not fingers or used cutlery.
  3. Optional: You can add a tsp or so of the fermented brine from a previous batch - this will help inoculate the fermented carrots from bad bacteria.
Troubleshooting
  1. • If you see any mould in the ferment, unfortunately it needs to be completely discarded. When using the anaerobic fermenting jars, it is very unlikely to have mould in a ferment.
  2. • It is normal for some kahm yeast to develop, this can look like a white substance on the top and throughout the ferment.
  3. • It is ok if over time the ferment becomes a bit slimy in texture, this is pectins from the carrots, and very good for your gut!
  4. • It is best to introduce ferments slowly, as they do cause die off of bad bacteria, which can result in detox symptoms. If you know that you are quite sensitive to detox, then you may need to go as slowly as one drop of brine and slowly increase from there.
Quirky Cooking https://www.quirkycooking.com.au/


 
Sauerkraut Juice
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Ingredients
  1. 250g organic cabbage
12g or 2 tsp sea salt or Himalayan salt
  2. filtered water to top up jars
  3. Also needed
 1L fermenting jar or 2 x 500ml fermenting jars
Instructions
  1. Thoroughly wash cabbage. Remove outer leaves and set aside. Cut the cabbage in half and remove the core.
Thermomix Method
  1. Cut cabbage into large pieces and place into TM bowl with salt. Chop 5 sec/speed 5. Remove to a large stainless steel or glass mixing bowl.
Conventional Method
  1. Dice cabbage finely. Place into a large stainless steel or glass mixing bowl and add salt.
  2. Optional: you can cover with a tea towel and set aside for 2-3 hours to soften the cabbage and draw liquid out, which will mean less massaging.

Massage cabbage with clean hands until the cabbage is very soft and there is a puddle of liquid at the bottom of the bowl.
  3. Fill the jar one third of the way with cabbage, then top up the jar with filtered water.
  4. Place kraut juice in a cool, dark place, out of direct sunlight, eg. a dark pantry. Leave to ferment anywhere between 10-12 days. Fermenting time can be affected by temperature, so if you are in the tropics you may need to move to the fridge sooner and continue fermentation there for another 5-10 days. 

Once the kraut juice is fermented to your liking, store in the fridge.
TO MAKE IN A FERMENTING CROCK
  1. Prepare as above, multiplying recipe to fill your crock. (Eg. Multiply recipe by 6 to fill a 5 litre crock.) Instead of using a folded cabbage leaf to hold down kraut, use the stones inside the crock, pressing kraut down firmly. Pour brine into crock and place lid on top. 

Once lid is on, fill the open moat with water. Check every day or so and refill moat as needed so it doesn’t dry out, or kraut will spoil. Do not open lid until you have fermented the kraut completely. 

Use a ladle to remove kraut and juice from crock to jars until you’ve removed most of it, then tip off the water in the moat. Tip remaining kraut and juice out into jars, place lids on jars, and store in fridge.
Notes
  1. IMPORTANT TIPS
  2. Once you have put the lid on the jar, do not be tempted to open it until the ferment is ready. Air can spoil the fermenting process and create mould.
  3. The cabbage may sink or float during fermentation. In the jars using an airlock, this should not matter or cause mould to grow as oxygen is not present. If you are concerned about mould growing on pieces that are not submerged, then move to the fridge sooner and continue fermentation there.
  4. White kahm yeast may develop on your ferment, this is ok just scrape off the top and consume as normal. If mould does form- furry spots that are green/brown/white/pink then the ferment will need to be discarded.
  5. Ideal temp for fermentation is 18-22ºC. In hotter temps, the ferment will take less time and will need to be moved to the fridge sooner. If you do have to move the ferment to the fridge early, then continue fermenting in the fridge before consuming, the door of the fridge is the best place for this as it is the least cool part of the fridge. You can ferment in an esky to keep temperature more even.
  6. Think of kraut juice as medicine. At the first sign of a cold, sore throat, runny nose or virus, start drinking kraut juice! You’ll find it really helps to knock colds and viruses on the head very quickly! The amount you drink is dependant on what you can tolerate - just drink what you feel you want to drink. Some will want to drink a cup or more a day when fighting off bugs, and others will only be able to manage a few sips. Listen to your body.
Quirky Cooking https://www.quirkycooking.com.au/

 


 

Chicken Liver & Bacon Pate
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Ingredients
  1. 6 cloves garlic
  2. 1 brown onion, halved
  3. 1-2 sprigs fresh sage (to taste)
  4. 4 green shallots, trimmed and halved
  5. 150g bacon
  6. 80g mushrooms (use tasty mushrooms like shiitake or Swiss brown for extra flavour!)
  7. 100g coconut oil
  8. 250g ghee or butter, plus 130g extra for sealing pate
  9. 500g chicken livers
  10. 1-2 tsp salt, or to taste
  11. 2 tsp freshly ground pepper, or to taste
Thermomix Method
  1. Place garlic, onion, sage, and green shallots into TM bowl and chop for 3 sec/speed 5.
  2. Add bacon and mushrooms and chop 3 sec/speed 5. Scrape down sides of bowl.
  3. Add coconut oil and cook 5 mins/100C/reverse/speed 2.
  4. Add chicken livers and chop 5 sec/speed 5.
  5. Add ghee and 1 tsp of salt and cook another 5 mins/100C/reverse/speed 2.
  6. Blend 1 minute/speed 8 (turning speed up slowly from 1-8) until smooth.
  7. Press pate through a fine metal sieve into a large bowl, using a silicone spatula to press through. (Optional, for a smoother pate.)
  8. Add pepper to taste and more salt if needed, and stir through. Transfer to ramekins, and smooth top of pate with back of a spoon.
  9. Melt remaining ghee or butter and drizzle approx 1 tablespoon over the pate in each ramekin, so that the pate is completely sealed.
Conventional Method
  1. Chop garlic, onion, sage, green shallots, bacon and mushrooms, and place into a frying pan with coconut oil. Saute gently over med-high heat for 3-5 mins or until soft and beginning to brown.
  2. Add livers to pan and saute for a further 3 mins, or until browned on the outside but slightly pink on the inside.
  3. Add ghee and 1 tsp salt and simmer over med-high heat for 5 mins, stirring to loosen any bits on the bottom of the pan.
  4. Transfer to a blender or food processor and blend for 1 min on high speed, or until smooth.
  5. Press pate through a fine metal sieve into a large bowl, using a silicone spatula to press through. (Optional, for a smoother pate.)
  6. Add pepper to taste and more salt if needed, and stir through.
  7. Transfer to ramekins, and smooth top of pate with back of a spoon.
  8. Melt remaining ghee or butter and drizzle approx 1 tablespoon over the pate in each ramekin, so that the pate is completely sealed.
Storage
  1. Store in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Once the ghee/butter seal is broken, use within a week. Ramekins can be frozen or pate can be poured into silicone cube moulds or cupcake cups and frozen for up to 2 months - just pop out what you will use within a week and thaw in the fridge.
Quirky Cooking https://www.quirkycooking.com.au/
Seedy Crackers
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Ingredients
  1. 40g flax seed (linseed)
  2. 120g pepita seeds
  3. 140g sunflower seeds
  4. 2 Tbsp mixed herbs
  5. 2 Tbsp nutritional yeast
  6. 2 tsp salt
  7. pepper to taste
  8. 60g olive oil
  9. 80g water
Thermomix Method
  1. Preheat oven to 170C and line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Add flaxseed, pepita seeds, sunflower seeds, mixed herbs, nutritional yeast, salt and pepper to Thermomix and mix 10 seconds/speed 6. Scrape down sides of bowl.
  3. Add olive oil and water and mix 10 seconds/speed 4, using spatula to help mixture along. Scrape down sides of bowl.
  4. Divide dough into two balls, and roll out one ball between two sheets of baking paper, to 3-5mm thickness. Remove top sheet of baking paper when done and place onto a baking tray. Repeat with second ball of dough.
  5. With a sharp knife, score the mixture both across and down to make rectangular crackers that will be easy to break apart once cooked.
  6. Place in oven and cook for 20-25 minutes, turning tray if needed, until golden and cooked through.
  7. Allow the crackers to cool completely before breaking apart. Store in an airtight container. Freeze if not using straight away.
Conventional Method
  1. Preheat oven to 170C and line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Place flaxseed, pepita seeds, sunflower seeds, mixed herbs, nutritional yeast, salt and pepper in a food processor and mix on med-high speed until seeds are mostly milled to a fine meal. Scrape down sides of bowl.
  3. Add olive oil and water and mix on medium speed until dough is formed, scraping down sides of bowl as needed.
  4. Continue as above.
Storage
  1. Store in an airtight container or reusable sealed bag for up to a week, or store in the freezer to keep them fresh for up to 4 months.
Quirky Cooking https://www.quirkycooking.com.au/

 


 

Pimento Cheese
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Ingredients
  1. 250g cheddar cheese
  2. 125g quark or softened cream cheese
  3. 1/4 teaspoon salt
  4. 2 tablespoons of juice from the pimento jar (you can use greek yoghurt or mayonnaise instead)
  5. pinch freshly ground black pepper
  6. 100g diced pimentos or chargrilled red capsicum (use marinated, chargrilled red capsicum, not roasted capsicum in oil as that will usually be vegetable/seed oils)
  7. Celery sticks to serve
Thermomix Method
  1. Cube cheddar cheese and place into TM bowl. Grate 8 sec/speed 8.
  2. Add quark or softened cream cheese, salt, pepper, and juice from pimentos (or yoghurt/mayo) and mix on 10 sec/speed 6 or until well combined.
  3. Add diced pimentos/chargrilled capsicum and mix 10 sec/rev/speed 3, using spatula to assist. You may need to stir a little with spatula if it doesn’t completely mix through.
  4. Serve spread in celery sticks, or with crackers or carrot sticks. Also delicious in toasted sandwiches!
Conventional Method
  1. Grate cheddar cheese into a large bowl. Add quark or softened cream cheese, salt, pepper, and juice from pimentos (or yoghurt/mayo) and mix together until well combined.
  2. Add diced pimentos/chargrilled capsicum and mix through.
  3. Serve spread in celery sticks, or with crackers or carrot sticks. Also delicious in toasted sandwiches!
Storage
  1. Store pimento cheese in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. If already spread into celery sticks, use within a couple of days or celery will become limp.
Quirky Cooking https://www.quirkycooking.com.au/
Herbed Meatballs
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Ingredients
  1. Large handful of flat leaf parsley, finely chopped; or 2 tsp dried parsley
  2. 2 tsp dried thyme leaves
  3. 1kg mince
  4. 2 tsp fine sea salt
  5. Pepper to taste
Method
  1. Preheat oven to 200C.
  2. Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl.
  3. Roll into walnut sized balls.
  4. Place balls onto baking trays, and bake 15-20 mins, or until cooked through and browned.
Notes
  1. If preparing ahead, allow to cool and place into a storage dish, retaining all the juices as this will help to keep the meatballs moist. Refrigerate for up to 3 days, or freeze for up to 3 months. (If freezing, you may want to add some beef or chicken stock to the dish so meatballs are covered, to prevent freezer burn. The stock can be used in other recipes when meatballs are thawed out.)
Quirky Cooking https://www.quirkycooking.com.au/

 

Nut Free Chocolate Bliss Ball Slice
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Ingredients
  1. 230g pepitas
  2. 110g unsalted butter or coconut oil
  3. 40g cacao powder
  4. 250g pitted medjool dates
  5. 1tsp vanilla extract or 1/2 tsp powder
  6. Pinch salt
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients into a Thermomix or food processor, and mix 2 mins/speed 10 (top speed), using spatula to scrape down sides as needed. This makes a smooth mixture - if you prefer it with a little texture only mix for 1 minute.
  2. Press into a lined, 30x20cm (or 25x25cm) baking dish, smoothing top with spatula. Refrigerate, then cut into squares once set. (Or if preferred, roll into balls.)
Storage
  1. Keep in fridge for a couple of weeks, or freeze in an airtight container for up to 3 months.
Quirky Cooking https://www.quirkycooking.com.au/
Whole Food Reference Guide
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Ask yourself these questions to work out if something is a healthy, nutritious, whole food
  1. - Is it a natural, living food with cellular structure that has been in the human diet for thousands of years? Or is it a new invention, made in a factory?
  2. - Could it be grown, raised, or made at home, or does it need a laboratory and a science degree to produce it?
  3. - Is it in a whole food form or a fractionated form?
  4. - If it’s in a packet, have they added anything unnatural to it? Radiated it? Sprayed with pesticides or sanitisers to kill bacteria?
  5. This will give you a basic idea of what is a whole food and what isn’t.
Fats/Oils
For cooking
  1. Animal fats (lard, duck fat, goose fat, tallow, dripping, butter, ghee) - smoke point approx 190C for animal fats, except for butter which is 175C and ghee which is 250C
  2. Coconut Oil (cold pressed) - smoke point 177C
  3. Extra Virgin Cold Pressed Olive Oil (only if fresh - produced within 12 months, there will be a date on the bottle) - smoke point 207C
For salads, mayonnaise, cold use
  1. Extra Virgin Cold Pressed Olive Oil
  2. High Oleic, Cold Pressed Sunflower oil
  3. Macadamia Oil
  4. Hemp Seed Oil
  5. Avocado Oil
  6. Sesame Oil, toasted, unrefined, occasional oil for adding flavour after cooking
  7. (Note: an easy guide to oil smoke points - if you see the oil/fat smoking, you have the heat too high and the oil/fat is damaged; rinse pan, start again.)
Sweeteners
  1. Raw honey
  2. Date syrup
  3. Dates & dried fruit (check that there are no added preservatives, sugars or vegetable oils)
  4. Pure maple syrup (acceptable, but not whilst healing the gut)
  5. Coconut sugar (acceptable, but not whilst healing the gut)
Grains/Starches
  1. Use in moderation (when tolerated), activated/soaked buckwheat, quinoa, teff, amaranth, millet, oats, rice
  2. Use in moderation (when tolerated), banana/cassava flour, tapioca, arrowroot, potato starch (check no preservatives added to starches)
  3. We do suggest avoiding/reducing grains and starches whilst working on healing the gut
Meat/Seafood
  1. Lamb, beef, chicken, pork, duck, turkey (Pasture raised, grass-fed, organic if possible)
  2. Wild game (deer, kangaroo etc)
  3. Wild caught seafood (avoid fish that have a high mercury content eg. mackerel, tuna, and swordfish)
Eggs
  1. Pasture-raised chicken eggs
  2. Pasture-raised duck eggs
Nuts/Seeds
  1. All nuts and seeds if they are tolerated. Activating can help with digestion of nuts and seeds.
Veggies/Fruit
  1. Local spray free is ideal, organic if possible
  2. We suggest avoiding/reducing vegetables high in starch, such as potato, sweet potato, yam, turnip and corn whilst working on healing the gut.
Quirky Cooking https://www.quirkycooking.com.au/